While some houses have small relatively windows, others offer floor to ceiling windows. Obviously there are aesthetic benefits when choosing to install those types of windows, but there are also some problems as well. Here are some of the common problems with poorly installed windows:
Problems with windows

Misalignment
Installing a bay window can be a difficult task. If someone is inexperienced the results can be less than desirable. When windows are installed, a glass sheet is placed, usually in aluminum. If it is not installed properly, or the glass is an improper size, misalignment may occur. If you’re installing an entire wall of windows, a misalignment can be a huge problem for you. When a window is misaligned, it protrudes from the facade and is visually unattractive.

Poor sealing
After sliding a window in the aluminum base, the contractor should put sealing in around the window. If this seal is incorrectly completed, it will not be waterproof. This could result in leakage or loss of energy through cracks and crevices around the window. Even if it’s sealed properly initially, the insulation may eventually deteriorate, so check the sealing occasionally to make sure it’s still intact.

 

Poorly sealed
After sliding a window in the aluminum base that will house, the installer should seal around the window. If this seal is not completed or incorrectly completed will not be waterproof; even air. This could result in leakage or loss of energy through cracks and crevices around the window. Even sealed properly to install the window initially, this insulation may eventually deteriorate, so check seal integrity occasionally necessary.

Energy Efficiency
Windows are not exactly known for their energy efficiency. Since a single-sheet glass is a good insulator, you can lose a lot of heat and air conditioning through the window during the winter and summer months. To reduce this problem, windows can be glazed with enamel booster or they can be replaced entirely by a contractor like Raleigh windows.

Replacement Cost
Since windows are made up of large glass plates, you’ll need to replace them if they break. Particularly, when mounted on a facade, these panels must be able to withstand shocks and bumps along the way so you’re not stuck with a hefty bill at the end.